Hampshire Gardens Trust Hutton Library

The library has now been renamed the HGT Hutton Library after the late Professor Stan Hutton and his wife, Barbara, who organised the setting up of the library at the University and continued to run it until 2007.

Valerie Joynt is the Honorary Librarian and looks after the collection of books we have at the library.  Valerie is always looking for suggestions from members and is keen to hear from anyone who has read a good book which covers our subject range i.e. designers, botanists, plant hunters, conservation and restoration of gardens and landscapes, public parks, general garden history and specific gardens anywhere which have historical significance.  Preference is given to books of a historical or scholarly content and particular preference goes to books about gardens and landscapes in Hampshire or books written by HGT members.

If you are willing to share your own thoughts with the HGT, please feel free to write your own review and email to the HGT office admin@hgt.org.uk and we will post it in the Book Review section of our website.

Click here for the Trust’s Library Webpage

Southampton University Highfield Campus

The Trust’s Library is based in the Hartley Library at the University of Southampton.
The HGT Hutton Library is part of Special Collections on level 4 of the Hartley Library.  It is open to all to use.

The books are shelved in the Special Collections open access area and can be used whenever the Library is open.

Click here for directions.

To use the library

When you first visit the library apply for a minicard by showing your HGT membership card and a piece of personal identification. The minicard gives you access to the library and enables you to borrow books.

Borrowing books

HGT books may now be borrowed except a few which will still be for reference only. There are also books relevant to our research on the open shelves which may also be borrowed. Consult Webcat typing in the author or title or keyword. If coming from a distance it is advisable to check to see if the book you require is in the library and not out on loan.

Parking

Parking is free and available after 5.30 p.m. weekdays, all times at weekends and in vacations. During working hours there is a university car park for visitors at the junction of University Road and Burgess Road, charging £1 per hour. Parking freely is possible in the roads near the university with a maximum stay of 2 hours.

Please click here for a history of the library and further information on its use

Book Reviews

Gardens of the Italian Lakes

by Stephen Desmond

Photographs Marianne Majerus. Pub. Francis Lincoln 2016. 224 pages £35.00. Reviewed by Sheila Carey-Thomas.

Cottages Ornés: The Charms of the Simple Life

by Roger White

Photographs Marianne Majerus. Yale U. P. 2017. 272 pages. Reviewed by Georgina Craufurd.

First Ladies of Gardening

By Heidi Howcroft

Photographs Marianne Majerus. ISBN 9-780-7112-3643-1. Publ. Frances Lincoln 2015. 176 pages. Reviewed by Georgina Craufurd.

Lancelot Brown and the Capability Men: Landscape Revolution in Eighteenth-century England

by David Brown and Tom Williamson

Pub. Reaktion Books. 2016. 250 pages. Reviewed by Wendy Bishop.

A Natural History of English Gardening 1650–1800

by Mark Laird

2015 Yale Unversity Press. 438 pages. ISBN 978 0 300 19636 8. RRP £45. Reviewed by Valerie Joynt.

Gardens of Court and Country 1630–1730

by David Jacques

Pub. Yale U.P. 2017, £45. ix + 406 pages, 299 illus. Reviewed by Georgina Craufurd.

Ichnographia Rustica – Stephen Switzer and the Designed Landscape

By William Alvis Brogden

Published by Routledge, March 2016. Reviewed by Valerie Joynt.

The Historic Gardens of England: Hampshire

By Timothy Mowl and Jane Whitaker

privately published by Stephen Morris, 2016, £19.95 from Wells Bookshop, Winchester or available direct from Tim via his website. Reviewed by Rosemary Baird

The Brother Gardeners, Botany, Empire and the Birth of an Obsession

by Andrea Wulf

Heinemann 2008, 246 pages. Longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2009. Winner of the American Horticultural Society 2010 Book Award. Reviewed by Janet Hurrell.